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Know Your Madisonian: UW-Madison professor examines abrupt ecosystem changes

In the article posted earlier today about Annie Proulx, Ms Proulx states, ” I personally have found an amelioration in becoming involved in citizen science projects. This is something everyone can do. Every state has marvelous projects of all kinds, from working with fish, with plants, with landscapes, with shore erosions, with water situations.”
The following article is a perfect example of that type of involvement. If you need help finding an organization near you where you can volunteer and become involve – please leave a comment.

In the summer of 1978 when Long Island native Monica Turner was an undergraduate at Fordham University, she volunteered as a naturalist in Yellowstone National Park.

…..

Now she’s leading a team exploring abrupt ecosystem changes — problems that spring up in a matter of years, much faster than the usual pace in the natural world. Many are related to climate change: increased extreme weather events, loss of coral reefs, and huge blooms of toxic algae.

Source: http://host.madison.com/wsj/news/local/know-your-madisonian-uw-madison-professor-examines-abrupt-ecosystem-changes/article_2deac191-02ad-5b7a-b2a4-d09a21ca7491.html

Go to Steven Verburg’s article (source) to read more about Ms Turner including a brief interview.

Here is link to Ms Turner’s website. Photo from the website gallery, photographer unknown.

Citizen scientists are unearthing the truth and spreading it. We don’t need the federal government to do anything – we can do it ourselves. What’s the hold up?

Thanks!

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